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Students in front of University College during spring convocation dressed in their gowns

Alumni

The success of University College (UC) is based on the strength of our community: students, faculty, staff, and alumni. More than 50,000 people have become part of the UC alumni community since our founding in 1853. The success of UC alumni is a source of pride and inspiration to us all. Together, we celebrate lifelong learning, embrace diversity, and live out the UC motto: Parum claris lucem dare, to shed light on that which is obscure.

2017 Alumni of Influence Award Recipient Roland Paris

Featured Alumni

Prof. Roland Paris (BA 1989 UC)

Roland Paris is an expert in international security and peacebuilding. He holds the University Research Chair in International Security and Governance at the University of Ottawa, where he is Professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. He has held advisory roles with the Privy Council, the Department of Foreign Affairs, the Federal-Provincial Relations Office, and the Prime Minister of Canada. A former director of research at the Conference Board of Canada, he is a regular commentator on international affairs, and the recipient of the prestigious Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving the World Order, among other honours.

Alumni Reunion in UC Quad

University of Toronto's Alumni Offerings

You aren't just part of the UC alumni community. Learn more about the events, benefits, networks and services available to all alumni across the university.

Upcoming Events

Oct 17-20
University College Book Sale 2019!

UC Library, 15 King's College Circle
Oct 24
Endowed Lecture Series
Young children rapidly develop a basic, commonsense understanding of how the world works.  Research on infants suggests that this understanding rests on early emerging cognitive systems for representing bodies and their motions, agents and their actions, people and their social engagements, places and their relations of geocentric distance and direction, forms and their scale-invariant geometry, and number:  six systems of core knowledge. These systems are innate, abstract, strikingly limited, and yet present and functional throughout human life.  Infants’ knowledge then grows both through gradual learning processes that people share with other animals, and through a fast and flexible learning process that is unique to our species and emerges with the onset of language. The latter process composes new systems of concepts productively by combining concepts from distinct systems of core knowledge.  The compositional process is poorly understood but amenable to study, through coordinated behavioral testing and computational modeling of infants’ learning. To illustrate, this talk will focus on core knowledge of objects, agents, and number, and on two new systems of concepts that emerge over human development and support uniquely human achievements:  the artifact concepts underlying prolific tool use, and the numerical concepts underlying counting and exact arithmetic.

Lecture: 4:30pm in UC 140
Reception to follow in UC 240 
Nov 13
Reception / Ceremony
The Alumni of Influence awards were established in 2012 in the belief that the success stories of our alumni should be known to current students and fellow graduates.
Nov 21
Endowed Lecture Series
Blood is a liquid that circulates in the bodies of human beings and other animals. How was it thought of in ancient culture? In an uncanny, disturbingly aestheticizing moment in Homer’s Iliad, Menelaos husband of Helen, for whom the war is being fought before Troy, receives a wound from the arrow of his Trojan enemy Pandaros. Athena deflects the arrow, as a mother brushes away a fly from a sleeping child, but it penetrates his armor: . . . straightway from the cut there gushed a cloud of dark blood.
As when some Maionian woman or Karian with purple (phoiniki)
colours ivory, to make it a cheek piece for horses;
it lies away in an inner room, and many a rider
longs to have it, but it is laid up to be a king’s treasure,
two things, to be the beauty of the horse, the pride of the horseman:
so, Menelaos, your shapely thighs were stained with the colour
of blood, and your legs also and the ankles beneath them.
                                    (Iliad 4. 140-47, trans. Lattimore) The poet-singer addresses the wounded man himself, later describes a scene of healing, and distinguishes between this blood and ikhor, the fluid flowing in the veins of the gods. The lecture will pursue questions of blood and the body; blood and the sacred; blood, belonging, and kinship, with some consideration of the applicability of these categories in the present.
Lecture: 4:30pm in UC 140
Reception to follow in UC 240