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Students in front of University College during spring convocation dressed in their gowns

Alumni

The success of University College (UC) is based on the strength of our community: students, faculty, staff, and alumni. More than 50,000 people have become part of the UC alumni community since our founding in 1853. The success of UC alumni is a source of pride and inspiration to us all. Together, we celebrate lifelong learning, embrace diversity, and live out the UC motto: Parum claris lucem dare.  To shed light on that which is obscure.

2017 Alumni of Influence Award Recipient Roland Paris

Featured Alumni

Prof. Roland Paris (BA 1989 UC)

Roland Paris is an expert in international security and peacebuilding. He holds the University Research Chair in International Security and Governance at the University of Ottawa, where he is Professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. He has held advisory roles with the Privy Council, the Department of Foreign Affairs, the Federal-Provincial Relations Office, and the Prime Minister of Canada. A former director of research at the Conference Board of Canada, he is a regular commentator on international affairs, and the recipient of the prestigious Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving the World Order, among other honours.

Alumni Reunion in UC Quad

University of Toronto's Alumni Offerings

You aren't just part of the UC alumni community. Learn more about the events, benefits, networks and services available to all alumni across the university.

Upcoming Events

Sep 19
Please RSVP by Sept 13th
The University College Alumni Association (UCAA) invites you to come learn about the College’s plans for the coming academic year and give your feedback on our programming.

The UCAA’s objective is to promote community among alumni, and between alumni, students, and University College. The UCAA presents the opinions and recommendations of alumni to the administration and faculty of the College, and serves as a resource in advancing the College’s mission.
Sep 26
Lecture
Please RSVP by Sept 17th
When Justin Trudeau won the 2015 federal election, predictions that he’d be prime minister for at least two terms came even before his first had begun. After all, his youth and Canada’s electoral history suggested a mere four years of Liberal government was unlikely. Instead, the 2019 election turns out to be highly competitive. UC Alumnus John Geddes, Maclean’s magazine’s Ottawa bureau chief, will talk about the contest as it gathers steam.    
Oct 3
Endowed Lecture Series
This lecture explores the ways in which the exterior walls of houses serve as boundaries, screens and skins on which both architects and viewers project meanings. Drawing on "Modern," vernacular, and historicist examples, the lecture considers cultural values, gender and sexuality, interrogating the meaning of transparency, both literal and figurative, and highlighting the ways in which private lives and non-conforming or queer households can be concealed behind the walls of "poker-faced" houses. 

Lecture: 4:30pm in UC 140
Reception to follow in UC 240 
Oct 24
Endowed Lecture Series
Young children rapidly develop a basic, commonsense understanding of how the world works.  Research on infants suggests that this understanding rests on early emerging cognitive systems for representing bodies and their motions, agents and their actions, people and their social engagements, places and their relations of geocentric distance and direction, forms and their scale-invariant geometry, and number:  six systems of core knowledge. These systems are innate, abstract, strikingly limited, and yet present and functional throughout human life.  Infants’ knowledge then grows both through gradual learning processes that people share with other animals, and through a fast and flexible learning process that is unique to our species and emerges with the onset of language. The latter process composes new systems of concepts productively by combining concepts from distinct systems of core knowledge.  The compositional process is poorly understood but amenable to study, through coordinated behavioral testing and computational modeling of infants’ learning. To illustrate, this talk will focus on core knowledge of objects, agents, and number, and on two new systems of concepts that emerge over human development and support uniquely human achievements:  the artifact concepts underlying prolific tool use, and the numerical concepts underlying counting and exact arithmetic.

Lecture: 4:30pm in UC 140
Reception to follow in UC 240